Category Archives: Visual Studio

.NET Reflector in Visual Studio 2012

Visual Studio 2012 is slated to ship soon, and when it does, Reflector will be sim-shipping right there alongside it. As part of our work to support the newest technologies from Microsoft (C# 5, WinRT, .NET 4.5) we’ve been working on Visual Studio 2012 integration and the new theming styles.

Nigel, our developer who’s been doing most of this UI coding, tells us a bit more about the work involved and how he did it:

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How .NET Reflector saved me hours of work

Take a free trial and find bugs in 3rd party components, libraries, frameworks, and any code where you don’t have the source.

A little while ago, I got an email from Ben, who’d been using .NET Reflector. We’d asked how his trial was going, and he told us about how Reflector let him drill down to a problem in 3rd party code in no time at all. It’s great to learn more about how the tool is being used, so we invited Ben to give us a little more detail:

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A new EAP release: Dev11, .NET 4.5, and C# 5

We’ve been a bit quiet on the EAP front recently, and there’s a reason for that. The rest of the team and I feel like we’ve spent the last fortnight locked in a meeting room. In hindsight, that’s substantially because we have. All I can see when I close my eyes is post-it notes, but we’re getting a lot closer to scoping out version 8 of Reflector.

V8 is all kinds of exciting, but still very much at the on-paper stage. But somehow, in the midst of all the planning, and sketching, and brainstorming, and well-intentioned bickering, Clive, Nigel, Ruchika, and Nick have shipped a new EAP.

The version 7.6 EAP is the first slice of our support for Visual Studio Dev 11, .NET 4.5, and C# 5

Reflector’s Visual Studio integration is now working in Dev11, so you can decompile code and start to debug it within the new VS beta. You can explore the changes in the .NET 4.5 framework too, and Clive has a blog post coming about this shortly.

Because it’s our first EAP, it’s not all up and running yet. For example, we aren’t currently decompiling the new C# async/await construct, but we’ll be fleshing out the C# 5 support in the coming releases.

To get an idea of what’s planned for Reflector 7.6, take a look at the EAP page

Microsoft’s //BUILD/ Conference and Windows 8: What does it all mean for .NET Reflector?

Last month I was fortunate enough to attend Microsoft’s //BUILD/ conference in Anaheim, CA. Those of you who follow my blog on Simple Talk will have noticed that I’ve started to post up my notes in bitesized (ish) chunks.

You’re also by now likely aware of the changes that are coming for Windows 8 with Metro, WinRT, .NET 4.5, C# 5, VB 11, Visual Studio 11, MVC 3, WP7.5 (Mango), and a whole host of other technologies getting a rev along with them. On top of this JavaScript and HTML5 are now counted as first class languages for the development of Windows apps, at least in Metro, and will have full support as such in the new versions of both Expression Blend and Visual Studio.

These are exciting times to be a .NET developer and its easy to see that the .NET platform, along with related technologies such as WinRT and Metro UI, make this arguably the most compelling software development platform available for any form factor or OS. Even the Silverlight developers amongst you shouldn’t be downhearted because although Silverlight may be entering the twilight of its existence (sorry) you’re all in a great position to use your existing skills to develop for Metro and Windows 8 – in fact you probably already have a leg up on the rest of us.

So what does this all mean for Reflector?

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